Kenneth Barry is a jazz saxophonist and composer, and the founder of Saxscape Mouthpieces
(www.saxscape.com), which are currently played by Benny Golson. Ken has studied improvisation
with Gary Campbell and Dave Liebman.  He met Artt Frank in 1998 at a jam session in Kansas
City, and has since played with Artt in numerous concerts and recorded with him on six CD's.  Ken
has been influenced greatly by Chet Baker's
mastery of phrasing, unerring melodic instincts, and incredible senseof time and rhythm.
Chet Baker Foundation
Honorary Board
Page II
Warren Chiasson is a highly regarded musician in the jazz world who has been called "one of the six
top vibraphonists of the last half century" by the New York Times.
Originally a member of the George Shearing Quintet, he has emerged as his own man with a
distinctive four-mallet technique that he weaves into a percussive, melodic style. Prior to forming his
own group, Chiasson was for many years best known for his creative contributions to the Chet Baker
Quartet, the Tal Farlow Trio, and jazz/pop diva Roberta Flack. In addition to recording his own
albums, he has played on over 100 recordings with such artists as Eric Dolphy, Bill Dixon, Hank
Crawford and was featured on a Grammy Award winning album with B.B. King
Tony Purrone is an extremely versatile Jazz Guitar Player, who, over the years, has
appeared with many of the top names in the Who's Who of Jazz. Who could forget his
memorable 21 years with Jimmy Heath, or claim not to have heard of these equally
legendary "Greats"...Dizzy Gillespie, Frank Foster & The Count Basie Band, Freddie
Hubbard, Paquito D'Rivera, Pepper Adams, Gerry Mulligan, Randy Brecker, Dave Leibman,
Kenny Garrett, Grover Washington, Lenny White, and many more!
Giacomo Gates is an authentic jazz vocalist. Heavily steeped in the traditions of the original vocal
improvisers from Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald through their modern counterparts Betty
Carter and Leon Thomas, Giacomo's own approach draws most heavily from the bebop-rooted
masters like Jon Hendricks, Babs Gonzales, King Pleasure and most of all, Eddie Jefferson. Like
his influences, Gates has forged his own unique path.
Richie Cole fans continue to toot his horn in praise of the jazz/bebop artist who was recently listed
in the 2006 edition of Marquis Who’s Who in America. Cole is recognized worldwide for the sweet
sounds of his alto sax and the creativity behind his Alto Madness Orchestra.   The Alto Madness
Orchestra was developed by Richie in the early 90's and its continuing popularity is proof of its
uniqueness. "The idea of the Orchestra is the concept and sound of an eighteen-piece big band
using only seven instruments, four of which are horns,"
Guillermo Calliero  is from San Jorge, Province of Santa Fe, Argentina. Soon after that, his family
moved to Río Gallegos, capital of Santa Cruz, the southernmost province in Argentina and the
continent.   He inherited his passion for music from his father, Carlos Calliero, a trumpeter, pianist
and director of the Young Band in Río Gallegos. "Of all the trumpeters, Chet has been my greatest
influence! The way he played, his sound, tone and personality will be unique forever!!!!"
Frank Tiberi studied clarinet at age 8; started playing professionally at 13; toured with Bob
Chester, Benny Goodman, Urbie Green, played with Dizzy Gillespie, self taught on flute,
(somewhere in between studied bassoon with the renowned Sol Schoenbach of the Philadelphia
Orchestra) played as a doubler in many Broadway musical shows before settling into the
illustrious "Four Brothers" sound (three tenors and baritone) reed section of the Woody Herman
Band in 1969 where, he became a featured soloist, section leader, arranger, music director and
ultimately leader of the Herman Band in 1987.
Whether you've heard guitarist Dave Stryker fronting his own group (with 19 CD's as a leader
to date), or as a featured sideman with Stanley Turrentine, Jack McDuff, and more recently
Kevin Mahogany, you know why Gary Giddins in the Village Voice calls him "one of the most
distinctive guitarists to come along in recent years." He was voted one of the Top Ten
Guitarists in the 2001 Downbeat Readers poll, and a Rising Star in the 2001,2004, and 2006
Downbeat Critics Poll.
Graham Bruce studied trumpet at Berklee and later formed his own quintet. He later moved to the
San Francisco Bay area and while there Chet spent a week with him on his way through to
Europe.  "Chet's sound and style had its affect on me even before I had met him-and later on,
when he spent a week with me, we shared a lot of ideas. And when I got to share the stage with
him, I couldn't believe what I was hearing.  I still love Chet, man,."   Graham is currently involved
in the writing for a "Birth of the cool" Nonet, for a CD project.  He also albums out as both a
leader and at least four as sideman for the Artt Frank jazz ensemble.
Steve Davis is widely regarded as one of today's leading improvisors on the trombone.  His
lyrical, hard-swinging style first gained him broad recognition during the 1990's while working
with the bands of jazz legends Art Blakey, Jackie McLean, Chick Corea's acclaimed sextet Origin
and the renowned cooperative sextet, One For All.
Bruce Gertz began playing guitar at the age of ten.  Bruce studied acoustic bass under John
Neves and William Curtis at  Berklee.  Bruce has toured with Billy Eckstine, Maynard
Ferguson, Marlena Shaw, Gary Burton, Dave Brubeck, Jerry Bergonzi and others and has
won many awards.  He is now a professor at The Berklee School of Music in Boston.
                             www.brucegertz.com
Earla Porch Frank was born in Cambridge, Mass., and studied Fine Art at the California Art
Center and Kansas University. Majoring in sculpture, she has produced many abstract bronze
works. Her flowing, lyrical pieces have graced many galleries throughout the country, including
the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, and the Harvard library in Cambridge Ma.   Since 1973, Earla
has also been commissioned to execute a number of portrait sculptures of jazz legends. Her
career as a sculptor is very tightly entwined with her life as a jazz vocalist. Earla has sung in
jazz clubs since she was in her teens and has worked with many jazz greats, including Chet
Baker and Duke Jordan. Some of these sculptures will be on display at the Down Beat Hall of
Fame in Orlando, Florida.
Sam Most; one of the first great jazz flutists, a cool-toned tenor, and a fine (if infrequent) clarinetist.  
He picked up early experience playing with the orchestras of Tommy Dorsey (1948), Boyd Raeburn,
and Don Redman. Most recorded fine sessions for Prestige, Debut (reissued on Xanadu),
Vanguard, and Bethlehem during 1953-1958, doubling on clarinet. He also worked in different
settings with Chris Connor, Paul Quinichette, and Teddy Wilson. After playing with Buddy Rich's
Orchestra (1959-1961), he moved to Los Angeles and became a studio musician.
Drummer Jeff Brillinger has toured and recorded with many jazz greats, including the Woody
Herman Orchestra, Chet Baker, Stan Getz, Horace Silver, Chris Connor, Tom Harrell, Jack
McDuff, and Ken Keplowsi, appearing at major clubs and festivals in the US, Europe, and Japan.
 Artt Frank really likes the way Jeff plays. He likes his
ideas, time and dynamics...and says he's one of his favorites.
John Tank is a jazz tenor saxophonist based in New York City  who  has toured internationally
including Canada, England, Holland, France, Switzerland, Spain and Germany. John played with
the great Charles Mingus on the recordings "Me, Myself And Eye" and "Something Like A Bird" as
well as a side member in groups led by Sam Rivers, Paul Jeffery, George Coleman, Joe Morello,
John Blair, Jack Walrath, Calvin Hill, among others. Some of his stylistic influences are Paul
Desmond, Lester Young, Stan Getz, John Coltrane, Wayne Shorter, Sonny Rollins, Joe
Henderson, Dexter Gordon and Zoot Sims. John Tank has developed an individual approach,
evolving out of a traditional Modern Jazz style that is often synonymous with the sound of New
York Jazz.
Bobby Shew spent three years as the jazz trumpet soloist in the famed NORAD multi-service band.
Shortly after leaving he joined the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra under the direction of Sam Donahue,
which, among other things, gave him the chance to perform quite a bit with trumpet legend Charlie
Shavers. After his stint with Tommy Dorsey, Bobby was asked to play with Woody Herman's band
upon Bill Chase's recommendation. He then spent some time playing for Della Reese and Buddy
Rich, who's big band had just been formed.
Jazz listeners living in the Los Angeles area and musicians worldwide have long known that Carl
Saunders is one of the great trumpet players around today. Now with the release of four
remarkable recordings (Out Of The Blue, Eclecticism, Bebop Big Band, and Can You Dig Being
Dug), Saunders’ musical talents can be heard and enjoyed by a much wider audience.
Sheila Jordan is one of the most consistently creative of all jazz singers.  She is one of the few
vocalists who can improvise logical lyrics (which often rhyme), she is a superb scat singer, and
is also an emotional interpreter of ballads.  She recorded as a leader (in addition to the Blue
Note session) for East Wind, Grapevine, SteepleChase, Palo Alto, Blackhawk, and Muse,
resurfacing in 1999 with Jazz Child.
For over six decades, saxophone master James Moody has serenaded lovers with his signature
song “Moody's Mood for Love” an improvisation on the chord progressions of “I'm in the Mood for
Love.” Born in Savannah, Georgia on March 26, 1925, and raised in Newark, New Jersey, James
Moody took up the alto sax, a gift from his uncle, at the age of 16.  His first Job was with Dizzy
Gillespie at the age of 21.  The rest is Jazz history.  To quote Peter Watrous of the New York Times,
"As a musical explorer, performer, collaborator and composer he has made an indelible contribution
to the rise of American music as the dominant musical force of the twentieth century."   And to quote
Mark Stryker from the Detroit Free Press “Moody might be the hippest 83-year-old on the planet.”
Astrud Gilberto, the legendary Brazilian-born singer, has always been affectionately referred to
by her fans as "The Girl from Ipanema", title of the Grammy winning song that launched her
international career in 1964. Astrud's unique vocal style has had a very strong influence in the
musical culture ever since, and has been an inexhaustible source of inspiration to artists,  
worlwide. Astrud Gilberto's original timeless and celebrated rendition of Brazilian, as well as
American music, such as "The Shadow of Your Smile", "It Might as Well be Spring", "Fly Me to
the Moon", "Look to the Rainbow", "Quiet Nights, "One Note Samba", "Meditation", "So Nice"
(and so many more) have been also included in various compilation albums of her work released
throughout the sixties, seventies, eighties, nineties, and two thousands' decades. Her song
writing ability, revealed in her seventies' recordings that included a duet with one of her idols,
Chet Baker, was further featured through the release of "Astrud Gilberto Plus the James Last
Orchestra" (1986), "Temperance" (1997), and "Jungle" (2002). Anyone visiting Astrud Gilberto's
official website will realize that Astrud is also a fine arts' artist, as well as an ardent advocate of
animal rights, having written a compelling essay on helping animals. Astrud Gilberto received the
"Latin Jazz USA Award for Lifetime Achievement" in 1992, was inducted to the "International Latin
Music Hall of Fame" in 2002, and was awarded the "Lifetime Achievement" Grammy Award, by
the Latin Recording Academy, in 2008.
From her early days playing in the subways of New York Ingrid Jensen has established  herself
as a leader and soloist in a wide array of musical genres,  Ingrid has made her mark. Her three
CD's for the ENJA label won her nominations from the Canadian Juno Awards, including an
award in 1995 for Vernal Fields.  "Chet was and will always be a huge inspiration to me and his
legacy of beautiful music continues to inspire both me and my students.  It is very important to
keep the body of  his work alive and well for all to enjoy, especially in light of the absence of
lyrical storytellers in the world of trumpet today."